FAQs

Yes. The KEWEVSE uses 4mm lead connections and has a 13A socket so is compatible with any MFT.

However, in the case of testing EV charge points, the adapter’s capabilities are limited by the functionality of the MFT being used. For example, you can use the adapter to help you carry out a 6mA RCD test, however, only if your MFT has the capacity to do so like the KT66DL does.

The KEWEVSE can be used to test a 3 phase charge point by connecting the distribution board leads on the MFT to the 4mm connections on the front of the adapter.

The old version KT63 can test type AC and ACS RCDs.

The new version KT63DL can also test A type RCDs as well as having a 10mA RCD test.

Good news…we can upgrade your KT63 to the new version KT63DL which includes both a hardware and software upgrade as well as a new printed circuit board and calibration.

To book your KT63 in for an upgrade or to find out more, simply call 0345 646 1404 and select option 2 for our repair and calibration service.

 

 

We recommend an annual calibration, however, there is no hard and fast rule. You are responsible for ‘knowing that your instruments are reading correctly at all times’, so if your instruments are used aggressively, say in an instrument pool and are taken out daily with little accountability, then you may want to have them tested more frequently.

If, on the other hand, if you personally look after your instruments, regularly against a check box such as our FC2000 and see no drift, you may feel that is OK to extend the calibration period.

Just by removing the Null and re-Nulling may be a simple solution, see ‘The importance of test lead nulling’.

Then for further checks test the leads and continuity circuit. Set the instrument to continuity and with the NULL ‘OFF’, loop each test lead in turn by putting one end in the brown ‘Live’ port and the other end into the green ‘Protective Earth’ port*.  Press the test button to make a measurement, the resistance of each lead should measure substantially the same. This not only checks the lead but also the internal circuits/fuse.

Should it be one of the rare occasions where the fuse is blown, replace the user-replaceable fuse in the battery department.

If the instrument is a KT64DL/65DL or KT66DL there is a spare replacement fuse located in the battery compartment.

Please note the replacement has to be a 500mA F 600V ceramic fuse.

*For the KT63DL these two ports are marked ‘+’ and ‘

Yes, all Kewtech Pat testers comply with the 5th edition.

PAT testing or more accurately Electrical Equipment testing is so important as more people get injured through faulty equipment than they do with problems with the fixed wiring of an installation. The key changes between COP 4 & 5 have been the emphasis on the use of 250 V insulation testing where sensitive electronic equipment is being tested and a change in the allowable limits, these have been relaxed. 

All our testers have the 250 V insulation range and the latest limits as pass and fails. The Code also describes two levels of competence to conduct testing.

The EZYPAT is perfect for the level 1 operator as it has green and red, go / no go indication. The EZYPAT Plus and the SMARTPAT are ideal partners to level 2 operators and offers run / leakage testing and the SMARTPAT offers fast test results downloading with the accompanying app.

If you experience the KEWPAT app (using Apple iOS) displaying the green Wi-Fi connection symbol  (see image 1) but does not actually communicate with your SMARTPAT the likely cause is an update of your device’s firmware made a change in the permissions for the app. This may not be initially obvious.

The solution is to go to your phone / tablet’s settings, scroll down to KewPat. Turn all permissions off and then on again. This should solve the communication issue.

Although rare it can come about after a software update and all the previous ‘permissions’ are not reinstated properly.

The dangers and incidences of a broken PEN conductor on the network’s supply have only recently been fully recognised. There is industry advice now that part of your safe isolation procedure should include a current test at the MET on the main earth bonding conductors to check that no current is flowing in components that could be common to other buildings.

This can be carried out with a KT200 or KEW2200 clamp meter both with 0.01A resolution. Or, for a full ‘safe isolation/everyday’ electrical tool the KT5 which offers non-contact, single pole and traditional two-pole voltage testing as well as a current measuring open jaw providing all the functions for proving dead in one instrument.

For those instruments that have an auto null facility for taking into account the resistance value of the test leads and which is remembered even when the instrument is switched off, the auto null memory needs to be cleared and reset from time to time. The Kewtech KT64DL, KT65DL and KT66DL procedure is below.

If adjacent to the F1 button NULL √ is shown remove this value:

Switch on the instrument.

Switch to continuity without the leads connected.
Press the test button and lockdown by turning it clockwise, >1999 is displayed.
Press the F1 button – NULL OFF should now be displayed.
Unlock the test button.
This has now cleared the memory.

Now refresh the test lead null.
Plug the test leads into L (brown) and PE (green).
Press and lock down the test button.

Short the tips together.
Press the F1 button and NULL √ should be displayed.

Unlock the test button.

A little known fact is that if a KEWTECH clamp meter has a MAX/MIN feature then the auto-sleep function is switched off when the MAX/MIN feature is selected. This means that you can leave the clamp measuring for a couple of days and when you come back to it, you will be able to recall the maximum current. This could perhaps save you having to hire a power quality analyser.

This is a question that we often get asked. The answer is a very positive YES for wherever 4 mm connectors are used, which is the vast majority of cases.

Many people buy our leads as first choice replacements. Our test leads go through a rigorous G7 test criteria including for pull out force, twisting/bending cycles and temperature. The items that are not universal are the probes which include the remote test button as comes with MFTs, as these connections are unique to each manufacturer.

There is much debate on how EV supply equipment should be tested. Some say that it is installed equipment and therefore the installation testing needs only to be done up to the equipment. We take the view that the installation including the EV charger should be tested. This is because the EV charger will, in the vast majority of cases, be located outside the equipotential area of a building and therefore has significant additional risks.

All our testers are capable of testing the loop and type A RCDs. Only the KT66DL is capable of testing Type B RCDs and 6 mA RDC-DDs both for individual time, tripping level as well as within auto sequences.

The equipment and the guidance for the installation of EV charging units are likely to develop over a long time. If you are intending to install EV charging units and are due for a new MFT, we strongly recommend you look at the KT66DL especially as it has features anticipating the future tightening up of the testing requirements for EV charging equipment.